About The COVID-19 Vaccination Programme

The COVID-19 vaccination is the largest vaccine programme in the history of the NHS. More than 75% of vaccines delivered in the UK have been delivered by Primary Care teams, led by GPs, on top of all their normal work commitments.

The vaccine has been delivered across the UK through local vaccination centres provided by groups of GP practices (Primary Care Networks), regional hospital hubs and pharmacies, and large-scale vaccination centres for high volumes of people.

Frequently Asked Questions About The Vaccine

We very much understand that you may feel anxious while waiting your turn to be vaccinated. Please do not contact your GP about getting the covid vaccine as they are currently rescheduling 2nd doses of vaccine to 8 weeks for the most vulnerable in cohorts 1-9, as directed by the government and public health officials.

If you do have any queries while you wait for a vaccine, or you have already got a vaccination appointment and have a few questions; we have outlined answers to some frequently asked questions below.

Click each of the tabs to see a list of questions.

[Last updated: 2nd June 2021]

Who will get the vaccine first?

From the start of the vaccination programme across the UK all vaccination services have been following Government guidance and JCVI priority groups starting with those most at-risk of severe covid disease:

  1. All adult care home residents and staff
  2. All those aged 80 years and over and frontline health and social care workers
  3. All those aged 75 years and over
  4. All those aged 70 years and over and clinically extremely vulnerable (shielding)
  5. All those 65 years of age and over
  6. All individuals aged 16 years to 64 years with underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of serious disease and mortality (clinically vulnerable)
  7. All those 60 years of age and over
  8. All those 55 years of age and over
  9. All those 50 years of age and over

Having delivered the 1st doses of vaccine to the majority of priority groups 1 – 9 outlined above (more information in the graphic below), local GP-led vaccination services are now focused on ensuring as many people from priority groups 1 – 9 have also had the 2nd dose of Covid vaccine (at a shortened dose interval of 8 weeks.)

The national vaccination programme in addition to the above are now also inviting people aged >25 years and over or who turn 25 before the 1st July 2021, through the National Booking Service.

It is estimated that those in priority groups 1 – 9 represent around 99% of preventable deaths from Covid-19. The target to have invited all of these groups for their first vaccination dose by the end of April was met (Phase One of the Vaccination Programme) and we are now in Phase Two of the rollout.

Currently the vaccine is being offered to those under 50 years old in the following order (cohorts 10 – 12) through invite by text and letter, as well as on-line booking through the National Booking Service or by phoning 119 :

  1. 40 to 49 years
  2. 30 to 39 years
  3. 18 years and over  – THE NATIONAL BOOKING SERVICE IS CURRENTLY OPEN TO THOSE AGED 25 YEARS OR MORE

Details of the national advice on priority groups for the vaccine is available on the Government website and in the graphic below (with recent footnotes and additions added below it.)

In addition to the image above please note: 

  1. See description of Clinically extremely vulnerable individuals. This advice on vaccination does not include all pregnant women or those under the age of 16 years.
  2. Priority six now also includes ALL adults with a learning disability and all who are in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill
  3. In addition all adult household contacts of anyone who is severely immunosuppressed are also now included in priority group 6 with more information on eligibility here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-vaccine-advice-for-adults-living-with-adults-who-are-immunosuppressed

Further details are on the Government website.

How will patients be invited for a vaccination?

If you’re eligible for a Covid vaccine you can book an appointment online through the National Booking Service or by phoning 119. The national booking service is moving down the age group cohorts; currently eligible people from cohorts 1 – 9 AND those aged over 25 years, or who turn 25 before the 1st July 2021 can book through the link above.

Sixteen Pharmacy-led sites are now delivering Covid vaccines in North Tyneside for eligible people (aged 25 or more) and are bookable on the National Booking Service as well as offering three walk-in clinics across the borough.

Our local GP-led sites are now focused on giving the 2nd doses of the Covid Vaccine and contacting people to offer a shorter dose interval of 8 weeks as per JCVI recommendations. PLEASE DO NOT PHONE YOUR GP ABOUT MOVING YOUR APPOINTMENT, THEY WILL CONTACT YOU.

If you need to cancel your second dose appointment at one of the GP-led sites, please email:

If you had your first dose at your local GP practice and haven’t had your second dose rescheduled yet, then please contact your GP practice directly.

YOUR GP PRACTICE CANNOT HELP YOU BOOK OR CHANGE AN APPOINTMENT WITH ANY PHARMACY-LED SITE. YOU CAN ONLY DO THIS VIA THE NATIONAL BOOKING SERVICE ON-LINE OR BY PHONING 119. 

More details about how to change or cancel appointments through the National Booking Service are available at the Healthwatch North Tyneside website

Why is the NHS vaccinating some groups before others?

The numbers needed to vaccinate per life saved go up as we move down the priority groups. These figures come from actuarial analysis of the pandemic so far, and are completely independent.

Getting our most vulnerable vaccinated as quickly as we could, while transmission rates were high, undoubtedly saved lives.

This now also applies to the variant of concern first identified in India that is currently circulating in North Tyneside (and other areas across the UK) that has led to a co-ordinated effort across the borough for surge testing and extra vaccinations – more information about this is available on the North Tyneside Council website.

The data gathered from the vaccination programme so far supports this phased approach to the rollout, with rates of serious illness and hospitalisation being significantly reduced in those who have received their first dose of vaccine.

Public Health England (PHE) analysis indicates that the COVID-19 vaccination programme prevented 10,400 deaths in those aged 60 and older in England up to the end of March, an additional 4,300 since the previous update. More about this analysis can be found here.

Why have I been invited to a vaccination centre outside my area?

The NHS has opened a number of large-scale vaccination centres and pharmacy hubs across the region, including one at the Centre for Life in Newcastle as well as further centres in Sunderland, Durham, Darlington, Hexham and Middlesbrough.

If you are aged 25 or over or turn 25 before the 1st July 2021, or are an eligible person from cohorts 1-9, you can now book a vaccine on-line through the National Booking Service link.

North Tyneside now has sixteen pharmacy-led vaccination services operational across the borough, that are bookable on the National Booking Service, or by phoning 119.

Why do I have to wait for my vaccination?

The vaccination programme is at a critical stage. The NHS is offering vaccinations to those at greatest risk from Covid-19 first, in line with recommendations from the Joint Committee for Vaccinations & Immunisations (JCVI).

The first groups offered vaccinations were adult care home residents and workers, frontline health and social care staff and people aged 70 and over, and those who are extremely clinically vulnerable (or shielding)

The vaccination of cohorts 1-9 (those aged 50 and over and who are clinically vulnerable as defined by the JCVI) is now almost complete for 1st vaccinations and GPs are hard at work delivering 2nd doses at a shorter dose interval of 8 weeks (rather than 12 weeks due to the circulating Covid variant of concern) to these cohorts and ensuring the highest uptake of vaccine.

It is estimated that taken together, these groups represent around 99% of preventable deaths from COVID-19.

Sixteen pharmacy-led sites are now operational in the borough for the delivery of vaccine to anyone in an eligible cohort (currently aged 30 years and above.)

We are working with all our partners in North Tyneside on the vaccine rollout to maximise vaccination uptake in light of the Covid variant of concern first identified in India that is currently circulating in the borough.

Last week mobile vaccination units were operational in the borough as well as walk-in vaccination clinics (which are still running in three locations) to try and reach as many people who lived and worked in North Tyneside as possible who were eligible for a vaccine (aged over 30 years) and hadn’t had their first dose yet.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SURGE TESTING AND VACCINATION IS AVAILABLE ON THE NORTH TYNESIDE COUNCIL WEBSITE.

I work for the NHS / in social care, when will I receive the vaccination?

Vaccination of patient-facing health and social care workers has been co-ordinated through hospital hubs and employers, as well as the nationally run mass vaccination centres and local GP-led vaccination services.

Anyone who is an eligible front line worker who hasn’t yet had the vaccine should book one through the National Booking Service, or by phoning 119.

I am housebound, can I get the vaccine?

Our local GP-led services have been vaccinating housebound patients from the priority groups from the start of the year. This process began as soon as we had delivered the first dose of vaccine to all 31 residential and nursing homes for older adults in the borough.

GPs and community nursing teams will be in touch to arrange both your 1st and 2nd jab appointments, but please be aware that they will be vaccinating people in age and priority order (as per JCVI above)

Can I get one privately?

No. Vaccinations will only be available through the NHS for the moment.

Anyone who claims to be able to provide you with a vaccine for a fee is likely to be committing a crime and should be reported to the Police 101 service and/or Local Trading Standards.

I have been told to pay for a vaccine?

The vaccine is only available on the NHS for free to people in priority groups, and the NHS will contact you when it is your turn.

Anyone offering a paid-for vaccine is committing a crime.

The NHS will never ask you to press a button on your keypad or send a text to confirm you want the vaccine, and never ask for payment or for your bank details.

If you receive a call you believe to be fraudulent, hang up.

If you believe you have been the victim of fraud or identity theft you should report this directly to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040. Where the victim is vulnerable, and particularly if you are worried that someone has or might come to your house, report it to the Police online or by calling 101.

What vaccines for Covid-19 are currently available?

A total of four vaccines have been approved for use in the UK having been given regulatory approval by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA):

Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines are widely available and both are being used across the UK. Moderna vaccine is also now being used in the vaccination rollout but the supply of this vaccine is relatively restricted compared to the other two.

All of the vaccines currently being delivered in the UK have been shown to be safe and offer high levels of protection.

A fourth vaccine, Janssen, has also just been approved for use in the UK. We understand supply will arrive in the UK of this one-dose vaccine later in the year and will update further as we know more.

Can people pick which vaccine they want?

Any vaccines that the NHS provide will have been approved because they pass the MHRA’s tests on safety and efficacy.

When you book a vaccine on the National Booking Service you will only be offered appointments for vaccines that are recommended for you based on your age, any underlying health conditions, and whether you’re pregnant.

Latest news with regards to MHRA and JCVI safety advice about Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine for those <40 years old with no underlying health problems:

Alternatives to the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine currently approved for use and available in the UK include the Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. The JCVI has weighed the relative balance of benefits and risks and advise that the benefits of prompt vaccination with the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine far outweigh the risk of adverse events for individuals 40 years of age and over and those who have underlying health conditions which put them at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease.

However JCVI currently advises that it is preferable for adults aged < 40 years without underlying health conditions that put them at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease, to be offered an alternative COVID-19 vaccine, if available. People may make an informed choice to receive the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine to receive earlier protection.

More information about this decision is available here https://www.gov.uk/government/news/jcvi-advises-on-covid-19-vaccine-for-people-aged-under-40

Will the vaccines work with the new strain?

There is currently no evidence that the new strains that are circulating widely in the UK will be resistant to the vaccines we have, so we are continuing to vaccinate people as normal. THIS INCLUDES THE NEW VARIANT OF CONCERN THAT WAS FIRST IDENTIFIED IN INDIA.

Scientists are looking now in detail at the characteristics of the virus in relation to the vaccines. Viruses, such as the winter flu virus, often branch into different strains but these small variations rarely render vaccines ineffective.

We do know however that new variants (including the one first identified in India that is circulating in North Tyneside and other areas of the UK) are often more transmissible. It is therefore even more important that people are vaccinated and continue to observe social distancing measures and infection control advice.

Government recommendations to bring forward 2nd doses of vaccine to 8 weeks was to limit the transmission of this new variant and protect the most vulnerable from cohorts 1-9 .

It is likely however that booster doses of the Covid vaccine that protect against any new strains will be used in the autumn going into winter (similar to the annual flu vaccine programme that looks at which flu strains are circulating and is adapted accordingly.)

For more information about the new variant of concern and other public health advice please follow Wendy Burke, North Tyneside Council and read more about this on the council website

Is the vaccine safe?

Yes. The NHS would not offer any Covid-19 vaccinations to the public until independent experts have signed off that it was safe to do so. The vaccines approved for use in the UK have met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Any coronavirus vaccine that is approved must go through all the clinical trials and safety checks all other licensed medicines go through. The MHRA follows international standards of safety. Millions of people have been given a Covid-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects have been very rare.

JCVI statement on use of the Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine – issued on 7th April 2021:

There have been reports of an extremely rare adverse event of concurrent thrombosis (blood clots) and thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) following vaccination with the first dose of Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. There has been no signal for thrombosis/thrombocytopenia following receipt of other COVID-19 vaccines approved for use in the UK (Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna).

Given the very low numbers of events reported overall, there is currently a high level of uncertainty in estimates of the incidence of this extremely rare adverse event by age group. However, the available data do suggest there may be a trend for increasing incidence of this adverse event with decreasing age, with a slightly higher incidence reported in the younger adult age groups.

In contrast, the risks of severe disease associated with COVID-19 increases steeply with age, with the youngest adults at lowest risk. There are currently no known risk factors for this extremely rare condition, which appears to be an idiosyncratic reaction on first exposure to the Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine.

To date, there are no reports of the extremely rare thrombosis/thrombocytopenia events following receipt of the second dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine. All those who have received a first dose of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine should continue to be offered a second dose of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine, irrespective of age. The second dose will be important for longer lasting protection against COVID-19.

JCVI advises that all individuals offered a COVID-19 vaccine should be fully informed about the benefits and risks of vaccination. This should include clear information on the extremely rare thrombosis/thrombocytopenia adverse event, how to monitor for symptoms that might be related to the adverse event, and what action should be taken by individuals and health professionals in the event of such symptoms arising.

This latest advice from the MHRA and JCVI with regards the safety of the Oxford/AstraZeneca is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-regulator-confirms-that-people-should-continue-to-receive-the-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca

Do the vaccines include any parts from foetal or animal origin?

There is no material of foetal or animal origin in either vaccine currently in use. All ingredients are published in the healthcare information on the MHRA’s website.

For the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine information is available here

For the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine information is available here

For the Moderna vaccine information is available here

Are there any side effects?

Like all medicines, vaccines can cause side effects. Most of these are mild and short-term, and not everyone gets them. Even if you do have symptoms after the first dose, you still need to have the second dose. Although you may get some protection from the first dose, having the full recommended course will give you the best protection against the virus.

You will always be given the opportunity to discuss any concerns about vaccination with a health professional across all our local vaccination sites in North Tyneside, and will be given written information to take away with you about the vaccine you have had and any potential side effects.

Very common side effects in the first day or two include: 

  • having a painful, heavy feeling and tenderness in the arm where you had your injection 
  • feeling tired
  • headache, aches and chills

You may also have flu like symptoms with episodes of shivering and shaking for a day or two.  You can rest and take the normal dose of paracetamol (follow the advice in the packaging) to help make you feel better. However, a high temperature could also indicate that you have COVID-19 or another infection so please self-isolate and seek a COVID-19 test (as per the advice on our main COVID-19 information page) and contact a health professional if you are concerned (see below.)

These very common side effects listed above normally last less than a week. If your symptoms seem to get worse or if you are concerned, call NHS 111. If you do seek advice from a doctor or nurse, make sure you tell them about your vaccination (show them the vaccination card) so that they can assess you properly. You can also report suspected side effects of vaccines and medicines through the Yellow Card scheme. You can do this online by searching Coronavirus Yellow Card or by downloading the Yellow Card app https://coronavirus-yellowcard.mhra.gov.uk

7th April 2021: MHRA issues new advice, concluding a possible link between Covid-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca and extremely rare, unlikely to occur blood clots.

The benefits of vaccination continue to outweigh any risks but the MHRA advises careful consideration be given to people who are at higher risk of specific types of blood clots because of their medical condition. As a precaution, administration of COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca in people of any age who are at higher risk of blood clots because of their medical condition should be considered only if benefits from the protection from COVID-19 infection outweighs potential risks.

Anyone who experienced cerebral or other major blood clots occurring with low levels of platelets after their first vaccine dose of Oxford/AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine should not have their second dose. Anyone who did not have these side effects should come forward for their second dose when invited.

The MHRA recently confirmed that the evidence to date does not suggest that the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca causes venous thromboembolism without a low platelet count. It is important to note that this type of blood clot together with lowered platelets can rarely occur naturally in unvaccinated people as well as in people with COVID-19 disease.

While the MHRA continues to investigate these cases, as a precautionary measure anyone that develops these symptoms below after vaccination is advised to seek prompt medical advice:

  • shortness of breath, chest or persistent abdominal pain, leg swelling
  • blurred vision, confusion or seizures
  • unexplained pin-prick rash or bruising beyond the injection site

Furthermore anybody with new onset of severe or persistent headache that does not respond to simple painkillers starting four days or more after vaccination should speak to their doctor.

For more information about this latest advice from MHRA please click here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/mhra-issues-new-advice-concluding-a-possible-link-between-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca-and-extremely-rare-unlikely-to-occur-blood-clots#history

Should people who have already had Covid get vaccinated?

The MHRA have advised that getting vaccinated is just as important for those who have already had Covid-19.

It is advised that if you have had Covid-19 infection you need to wait four weeks before you can be vaccinated.

Will the Covid-19 vaccine protect me from flu?

No, the COVID-19 vaccine will not protect you against the flu. We would advise anyone who hasn’t had a flu vaccine, who is eligible for one when flu season arrives, to get one.

Are there any people who shouldn’t have the vaccine?

People with history of a severe allergy to the ingredients of the vaccines, or who have had a Covid vaccine and suffered an allergic reaction, should not be vaccinated and should be referred to an allergy specialist.

People who have ever had a severe allergy (anaphylaxis) where the cause was not identified should not receive the Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, but might be able to have the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine after discussion with an allergy specialist.

7th April 2021: MHRA issues new advice, concluding a possible link between Covid-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca and extremely rare, unlikely to occur blood clots.

The benefits of vaccination continue to outweigh any risks but the MHRA advises careful consideration be given to people who are at higher risk of specific types of blood clots because of their medical condition. As a precaution, administration of COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca in people of any age who are at higher risk of blood clots because of their medical condition should be considered only if benefits from the protection from COVID-19 infection outweighs potential risks.

Anyone who experienced cerebral or other major blood clots occurring with low levels of platelets after their first vaccine dose of COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca should not have their second dose. Anyone who did not have these side effects should come forward for their second dose when invited.

Pregnant women should discuss with their healthcare professional whether the benefits of having the vaccine outweigh the risks for them. The latest JCVI advice issued regarding vaccination of pregnant women recommend that Pfizer/BioNTech or Moderna vaccines are used in pregnant women rather than Oxford/AstraZeneca. More information about this can be read here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/jcvi-issues-new-advice-on-covid-19-vaccination-for-pregnant-women

The MHRA recently confirmed that the evidence to date does not suggest that the COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca causes venous thromboembolism without a low platelet count. It is important to note that this type of blood clot together with lowered platelets can rarely occur naturally in unvaccinated people as well as in people with COVID-19 disease.

While the MHRA continues to investigate these cases, as a precautionary measure anyone that develops these symptoms below after vaccination is advised to seek prompt medical advice:

  • shortness of breath, chest or persistent abdominal pain, leg swelling
  • blurred vision, confusion or seizures
  • unexplained pin-prick rash or bruising beyond the injection site

Furthermore anybody with new onset of severe or persistent headache that does not respond to simple painkillers starting four days or more after vaccination should speak to their doctor.

For more information about this latest advice from MHRA please click here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/mhra-issues-new-advice-concluding-a-possible-link-between-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca-and-extremely-rare-unlikely-to-occur-blood-clots#history

What about pregnancy and breastfeeding?

New advice from the JCVI has been released on the 17th April 2021 regarding COVID-19 vaccination for pregnant women.

The JCVI has advised that pregnant women should be offered the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as the rest of the population, based on their age and clinical risk group. There have been no specific safety concerns identified with any brand of coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines in relation to pregnancy.

Real-world data from the United States shows that around 90,000 pregnant women have been vaccinated, mainly with mRNA vaccines including Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna, without any safety concerns being raised.

Based on this data, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) advises that it’s preferable for pregnant women in the UK to be offered the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines where available. There is no evidence to suggest that other vaccines are unsafe for pregnant women, but more research is needed.

The advice, published in Public Health England’s Green Book, a clinical professional guide for vaccinators in the UK, still advises that pregnant women should discuss the risks and benefits of vaccination with their clinician, including the latest evidence on safety and which vaccines they should receive.

Women who are planning pregnancy, are in the immediate postpartum, or are breastfeeding can be vaccinated with any vaccine, depending on their age and clinical risk group.

The JCVI will continue to closely monitor the evidence on COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy and will update its advice as required.

More information about this issue is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/jcvi-issues-new-advice-on-covid-19-vaccination-for-pregnant-women

I’m currently ill with Covid-19, can I get the vaccine?

People currently unwell and experiencing COVID-19 symptoms should not receive the vaccine until they have recovered.

The guidance says this should be at least four weeks after the start of symptoms or from the date of a positive Covid-19 test.

Why are second doses of the vaccine being rescheduled?

NEW 14th May 2021: The most vulnerable from cohorts 1-9 are being offered second dose of COVID-19 vaccine earlier, to help protect against variants of concern

This action is part of measures to tackle rising cases of the B1.617.2 variant of concern (originally identified in India) that is currently circulating in North Tyneside and other areas of the UK.

The country’s most vulnerable are to be offered their second COVID-19 vaccine earlier, the government has announced, as part of plans to tackle rising cases of the B1.617.2 variant of concern first identified in India.

Appointments for a second dose of a vaccine will be brought forward from 12 to 8 weeks for the remaining people in the top 1-9 priority groups who have yet to receive their second dose. This is to ensure people across the UK have the strongest possible protection from the virus at an earlier opportunity.

The move follows updated advice from the independent experts at the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI), which has considered the latest available evidence on the variant and has recommended reducing the dosing interval to help protect the nation from the variant.

People should continue to attend their second dose appointments and nobody needs to contact the NHS. The NHS will let those who should bring their appointment forward know, when they are able to do so. Those aged under 50 will continue to get their first dose, with their second dose at 12 weeks, as has been the deployment strategy so far.

Additional measures will be implemented in areas where clusters of cases have been detected to stop further spread. These include:

  • enhanced testing and contact tracing, including enhanced community and surge testing in areas defined by the local authorities and regional teams
  • increased genome sequencing of positive cases
  • increased community engagement, including ensuring that messages are accessible in languages that are used by communities
  • working closely with communities and community leaders to ensure that individuals are supported to test and self-isolate
  • encouraging uptake for the age and risk groups currently prioritised for vaccination

MORE ABOUT WHAT THIS MEANS FOR NORTH TYNESIDE CAN BE FOUND ON THE COUNCIL WEBSITE

How do I change or cancel a Covid-19 vaccine appointment?

If you booked your vaccine through the National Booking System 

You will need:

Then:

  1. Go to https://www.nhs.uk/book-a-coronavirus-vaccination/do-you-have-an-nhs-number OR you can phone 119, between 7am – 11pm.
  2. Click manage my booking
  3. You will need to CANCEL your booking BEFORE you can get a new appointment
  4. Enter your personal details
  5. Select a location and date that works for you. If your choice are limited you can try again later as more appointments are added during the day.

If you booked your vaccine through your GP practice:  

Many second dose appointments are being rescheduled to 8 weeks, for vulnerable people in cohorts 1-9. Your practice will contact you if you appointment is changing. PLEASE DO NOT PHONE YOUR GP PRACTICE.

If you need to cancel your second dose appointment at one of the GP led sites, please email:

(If you had your first dose at your local GP practice, and they haven’t already contacted you, then please contact them directly to re-arrange your appointment.)

More information about why 2nd dose appointments are being changes is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/most-vulnerable-offered-second-dose-of-covid-19-vaccine-earlier-to-help-protect-against-variants

Where can I find out more?

The latest information will continue to be available and updated on our TyneHealth COVID-19 Information Hub

More information is also available on the NHS website. The BBC has also produced some helpful information about the vaccines in five South Asian languages.

Why are some people being sent letters and some people getting text messages?

Please be aware there are two vaccination systems running alongside each other: a national vaccination booking system, and our local GP-led vaccination services in North Tyneside. 

Both systems have delivered 1st and 2nd doses of vaccine to cohorts 1 – 9. The National Booking System is now also inviting > 25 year olds in addition to cohorts 1 – 9, and will continue to offer appointments down the age cohorts.

Please be aware of the two different systems:

➡️ The National Booking Service will only allow you to book into a mass vaccination centre or pharmacy hub. Invites are sent out by letter or text, or if you are eligible you will be able to book your appointment through the National Booking Service on-line or by phoning 119. In our area, the nearest mass vaccination sites include The Centre for Life in Newcastle and Sunderland’s Nightingale Hospital, as well as sixteen Pharmacy-led sites that are now operational across North TynesideCurrently the national service is inviting those people where the following apply:

    • you were aged 25 or over or turn 25 before the 1st July 2021
    • you are at high risk from coronavirus (clinically extremely vulnerable/shielding)
    • you have a condition that puts you at higher risk (clinically vulnerable)
    • you have a learning disability
    • you are an eligible frontline health or social care worker
    • you get a Carer’s Allowance, get support following an assessment by the local authority or your GP record shows you are a carer having registered through the North Tyneside Carers Centre

➡️ Local GP-led vaccination services all three sites in North Tyneside are focused on rescheduling and ensuring delivery of 2nd doses of Covid vaccine to the most vulnerable in our community from cohorts 1-9, at the shorter 8 week dose interval.

These local vaccination services in North Tyneside are led by the four Primary Care Networks (PCNs), across three vaccination sites:

  • The Parks, North Shields – for those registered with a GP Practice in the Whitley Bay or North Shields PCN areas.
  • The Langdale Centre, Wallsend – for those registered with a GP Practice in the Wallsend PCN area.
  • The Oxford Centre, Longbenton – for those registered with a GP Practice in the North West PCN area.

Second dose appointments for the above services are being brought forward to 8 weeks. Your practice will contact you if you appointment is changing by text, email or letter. PLEASE DO NOT PHONE YOUR GP ABOUT GETTING A COVID VACCINE.

If you need to cancel your second dose appointment at one of the GP-led sites, please email:

  1. ntccg.covidatthecoast@nhs.net for The Parks, North Shields
  2. ntccg.nwntpcn@nhs.net or ring 0330 223 0349 for the Oxford Centre, Longbenton
  3. ntccg.wallsendpcn@nhs.net for the Langdale Centre, Wallsend

(If you had your first dose at your local GP practice, then please contact them directly to cancel or rebook your second dose, if you haven’t been contacted already.)

After 2nd doses of Covid vaccine are completed for the most vulnerable in cohorts 1-9, our local GP-led vaccination services will no longer be delivering Covid vaccines so they can focus on all that is needed in Primary Care and getting GP services back to normal as restrictions ease. All covid vaccinations going forwards for the age cohorts 10 – 12 (< 50 years) will be delivered by the National Booking Service, with sixteen Pharmacy-led sites available and operational across North Tyneside borough, including currently three walk-in services.

Why have I been invited to a vaccination centre outside my area?

The NHS has two systems operating, the first is being led by GPs and Primary Care Networks operating local vaccination services in North Tyneside in North Shields, Longbenton and Wallsend.

The second system is run by the NHS nationally who have opened a number of large-scale vaccination centres and pharmacy hubs across the region such as The Centre for Life in Newcastle, Sunderland’s NHS Nightingale Hospital in Washington, the Arnison Centre Retail Park in Durham and at Darlington Arena. 

A number of community pharmacy hubs throughout the region are also administering vaccines. Sixteen Pharmacy-led sites have opened in North Tyneside and are operational; these sites are bookable on the National Booking System (depending on vaccine supply.)

What do I do if I am not on-line and/or I don’t have a mobile phone?

We are working locally with our community partners VODA and their Digital Health Champions team to offer advice and guidance to help residents navigate the range of digital options to access their GP as well as booking a vaccine appointment on-line.

In addition to this, there are three NEW walk-in vaccination services for people who live or work in North Tyneside where no appointment is necessary. These are for first vaccinations only for anyone aged over 30 and you will be offered a vaccine that is appropriate for your age group.

These walk-in clinics run between 11am to 1pm and 5pm to 7pm each day

  • The Cedarwood Trust, Pharmacy2u, The Avenue, Avon Avenue, North Shields NE29 7QT
  • The Village Hotel, Pharmacy2u, 10 The Silverlink North – NE27 0BY
  • Collingwood Centre, Pharmacy2U – Unit 13-14 Collingwood Centre, Preston North Road, Tynemouth – NE29 9QR

We will be updating residents about this in the coming weeks to ensure all people who want to have a vaccine and can only access local sites, are able to book into an appointment in North Tyneside.

More information can about the above extra vaccination capacity across the borough, as well as surge testing options can be found on North Tyneside Council’s website

How do I cancel and rebook an appointment?

If you booked your vaccine through the National Booking System 

You will need:

Then:

  1. Go to https://www.nhs.uk/book-a-coronavirus-vaccination/do-you-have-an-nhs-number OR you can phone 119, between 7am – 11pm.
  2. Click manage my booking
  3. You will need to CANCEL your booking BEFORE you can get a new appointment
  4. Enter your personal details
  5. Select a location and date that works for you. If your choice are limited you can try again later as more appointments are added during the day.

If you booked your vaccine through your local GP practice:  

Many second dose appointments are being rescheduled to 8 weeks, for vulnerable people in cohorts 1-9. Your practice will contact you if you appointment is changing. PLEASE DO NOT PHONE YOUR GP PRACTICE.

If you need to cancel your second dose appointment at one of the GP led sites, please email:

(If you had your first dose at your local GP practice, and they haven’t already contacted you, then please contact them directly to re-arrange your appointment.)

More information about why 2nd dose appointments are being changes is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/most-vulnerable-offered-second-dose-of-covid-19-vaccine-earlier-to-help-protect-against-variants

Where can I find out more?

The latest information will continue to be available and updated on our TyneHealth COVID-19 Information Hub and on our partner websites such as Healthwatch North Tyneside, North Tyneside Council, VODA and the North Tyneside Clinical Commissioning Group (NTCCG.)

More information is also available on the NHS website. The BBC has also produced some helpful information about the vaccines in five South Asian languages.

National Booking Service

Those under 50 years of age from cohorts 10 – 12 are now been prompted to book their COVID-19 vaccinations using the NHS Booking Service online or by ringing 119.

A large number of Pharmacy-led vaccination sites are now administering vaccines across North Tyneside, with more opening all the time including three walk-in sites.

All of these sites operate independently from general practice – your GP surgery will NOT be able to book appointments for you at these sites. This can only be done though the National Booking System.

There is a number of other community pharmacy sites across the North East offering vaccines plus a number of larger vaccination centres in Newcastle, Sunderland, Durham, Hexham, Darlington and Middlesbrough. All vaccine appointments across these systems are subject to national vaccine supply.

Walk In Vaccination Service

In addition to the above booking system,  three of the pharmacy-led sites are offering a new walk-in vaccination services for people who live or work in North Tyneside where no appointment is necessary.

These are for first vaccinations only for anyone aged over 25 and you will be offered a vaccine that is appropriate for your age group.

The GP-Led Sites Across North Tyneside

All of our GP-led sites in North Tyneside are focused on rescheduling and ensuring delivery of 2nd doses of Covid vaccine to the most vulnerable in our community from cohorts 1-9, at the shorter 8 week dose interval. 

Local GP-led vaccination services in North Tyneside are led by the four Primary Care Networks (PCNs), across three vaccination sites indicated on the map.

Your GP practice will contact you if you appointment is changing by text, email or letter. PLEASE DO NOT PHONE YOUR GP ABOUT GETTING A COVID VACCINE.

If you need to cancel your second dose appointment at one of the GP-led sites, please email:

  1. ntccg.covidatthecoast@nhs.net for The Parks, North Shields
  2. ntccg.nwntpcn@nhs.net or ring 0330 223 0349 for the Oxford Centre, Longbenton
  3. ntccg.wallsendpcn@nhs.net for the Langdale Centre, Wallsend